That awkward moment when your dad tries to cheer you up by teasing you about having small breasts

Well actually my own dad would tell me how happy he was that my mom had small boobs because he could hold her tight against him and feel her heart beat against his

(Source: ramblingsofagirlgeek)

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sagansense:

"Evolution happens like a movie, with frames moving by both quickly and gradually, and we often can’t see the change while it’s occurring. Every time we find a fossil, it’s a snapshot back in time, often with thousands of frames missing in between, and we’re forced to reconstruct the whole film. Life is what happens in between the snapshots."
Joe Hanson

Joe’s latest It’s Okay To Be Smart video explores our scaly evolutionary lineage, predating our grandest grandparents of all - modern humans (yes, we in fact do have a much more enriching and fantastic ancestral history beyond our third cousin’s mate on your father’s side who was a quarter Polynesian….or something).

One of the most basic questions we’re faced with as human beings, regardless of age, race, creed, color, or country or origin, is "who are we?" But we can go even deeper than that, asking "what" are we? Yet, that question even begs an even more enchanting query…"how" are we?

When exploring what starts out as such a seemingly simple question, we find that we’re at the end of a very long, nearly incomprehensible branch rung road which - never mind the fact that we’re still very much recent travelers - has some pretty intense twists and turns when using some of the vehicles called anthropology, paleontology, archaeology, paleobiology, geology and genetics to traverse this route of biodiversity from whence we came.

I encourage all of you to watch Joe’s recent video which briefly explores this intimate connection we have to the millions of years of biology and complex chemistry we share with everything and everyone around us. Plus, Joe apparently has been taking some flack from the religious fundies who have the time to patronize, slander, and sling their anti-intellectual dogma around the internet, but just can’t seem to figure out how to steer themselves onto the proper educational websites and online open resource material which is widely accessible to everyone…in the world.

Be sure to check out Joe’s follow up video on our fishy ancestry, ‘Do Fish Have Thumbs?, where he interviews Dr. Neil Shubin, paleontologist, geneticist, and author of the book 'Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body', to which a 3-part series has been developed under the same title by PBS.

In Joe’s interview with Shubin, the “anatomical mix between fish and a land-living animal" - known as Tiktaalik - is explored. What is Tiktaalik and why is it so special? Because it proves that the ‘Darwin fish’ (below) is well, a thing. And Christians/Creationists hate it :)

imageRead Slate’s article on the Tiktaalik fossil featuring Dr. Shubin, and why it’s a slap in the face to creationism.

Related: Stated Clearly’s videos on Natural Selection, Evolution (and how it works), Genes, DNA, and even, where we are in our understanding of the origin of life.

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to finish the bottle or not to finish the bottle, that is the question

i just want to smoke weed tbh fuck this shit fuck errrything 

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In a sky swarming with uncountable stars, clouds endlessly flowing, and planets wandering, always and forever there has been just one moon and one sun. To our ancestors, these two mysterious bodies reflected the female and the male essences. From Iceland to Tierra del Fuego, people attributed the Sun’s constancy and power to his masculinity; the Moon’s changeability, unspeakable beauty, and monthly cycles were signs of her femininity.To human eyes turned toward the sky 100,000 years ago, they appeared identical in size, as they do to our eyes today. In a total solar eclipse, the disc of the moon fits so precisely over that of the sun that the naked eye can see solar flares leaping into space from behind.But while they appear precisely the same size to terrestrial observers, scientists long ago determined that the true diameter of the sun is about four hundred times that of the moon. Yet incredibly, the sun’s distance from Earth is roughly four hundred times that of the moon’s, thus bringing them into unlikely balance when viewed from the only planet with anyone around to notice.Some will say, “Interesting coincidence.” Others will wonder whether there isn’t an extraordinary message contained in this celestial convergence of difference and similarity, intimacy and distance, rhythmic constancy and cyclical change. Like our distant ancestors, we watch the eternal dance of our sun and our moon, looking for clues to the nature of man and woman, masculine and feminine here at home.

This is how Sex at Dawn ends. I am very sad to have finished this book because it was such a fascinating read about the prehistoric origins of human sexuality. I definitely feel that it has deepened my understanding of biological human sexuality but still, I will look into newer, more academic works on the topic, namely primatologist professor Bernard Chapais’ Primeval Kinship. Again, I can’t recommend you enough to download the PDF on your phone or tablet and read it for yourself as well. Good times guaranteed. And remember, self-knowledge is power!

In a sky swarming with uncountable stars, clouds endlessly flowing, and planets wandering, always and forever there has been just one moon and one sun. To our ancestors, these two mysterious bodies reflected the female and the male essences. From Iceland to Tierra del Fuego, people attributed the Sun’s constancy and power to his masculinity; the Moon’s changeability, unspeakable beauty, and monthly cycles were signs of her femininity.

To human eyes turned toward the sky 100,000 years ago, they appeared identical in size, as they do to our eyes today. In a total solar eclipse, the disc of the moon fits so precisely over that of the sun that the naked eye can see solar flares leaping into space from behind.

But while they appear precisely the same size to terrestrial observers, scientists long ago determined that the true diameter of the sun is about four hundred times that of the moon. Yet incredibly, the sun’s distance from Earth is roughly four hundred times that of the moon’s, thus bringing them into unlikely balance when viewed from the only planet with anyone around to notice.

Some will say, “Interesting coincidence.” Others will wonder whether there isn’t an extraordinary message contained in this celestial convergence of difference and similarity, intimacy and distance, rhythmic constancy and cyclical change. Like our distant ancestors, we watch the eternal dance of our sun and our moon, looking for clues to the nature of man and woman, masculine and feminine here at home.

This is how Sex at Dawn ends. I am very sad to have finished this book because it was such a fascinating read about the prehistoric origins of human sexuality. I definitely feel that it has deepened my understanding of biological human sexuality but still, I will look into newer, more academic works on the topic, namely primatologist professor Bernard Chapais’ Primeval Kinship. Again, I can’t recommend you enough to download the PDF on your phone or tablet and read it for yourself as well. Good times guaranteed. And remember, self-knowledge is power!

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ssssssiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiggggghhhhh

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(Source: deenstoya, via babycuts)

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There is no other species on the Earth that does science. It is, so far, entirely a human invention, evolved by natural selection in the cerebral cortex for one simple reason: it works. It is not perfect. It can be misused. It is only a tool. But it is by far the best tool we have, self-correcting, ongoing, applicable to everything.
— Carl Sagan, Cosmos, 1980

(Source: humanoidhistory, via humanoidhistory)

96 Notes